BRYAN M. FERGUSON


 tell us about you

I’m a filmmaker and sometimes photographer from Glasgow, Scotland. I’m too observant for my own good and my sense of humour is disgusting.

“RUBBER GUILLOTINE follows an angsty 17 year old girl who sucker punches her parent’s hopes for her future by aspiring to donate her skeleton to gelatine."


what are your inspirations? 

It’s actually difficult to try and pinpoint what influences my work. Aside from the obvious (the work of other filmmakers, musician or painter, etc.), anything and everything can be influential in some way. Anything from a bad cup of coffee to an awkward conversation or even something stupid scrawled on the wall of a public toilet - the list is endless.

"Somewhere in Florida, a strange chemical reacts with the chlorine of a hotel swimming pool. When discovered, a young resident starts recruiting followers for her weird cult." 


How do you shape new ideas? 

My brain is always in overdrive – which leaves me sleepless and exhausted a lot of the time. So I’m always thinking. I tend to live my day to day life and frame it in my head, cutting conversations like a scene in a film. I have tons of little bits and pieces tangled in my head. It usually starts with an image or scene and from there I will connect the dots while I research. I normally have something I’m fascinated with at the time that I research extensively and that can be anything from an odd news article, a subculture or a domestic household item – whatever it is, the idea will just form and snowball into what I end up writing. Though it does take me quite some time to settle on what the next project will be because I’m always thinking of how my body of work looks like as a whole. 

"Polly's delusions of grandeur are causing her comic book obsessed mind to take a step in the wrong direction. what was once a bored spanish girl lost in comics is now a masked sociopath with a thirst for mischief.
submerging herself into a misbelieved hyper-reality, polly "wreaks havoc" upon her boring floridian town as her alter-ego, "Polly paper cut".


has your style changed or evolved since your first shortfilm? 

I think I only scratched the surface of what my style would be when I made ‘The Misbehaviour of Polly Paper Cut’ (2013).
It’s not a film I’m overly proud of or happy with, but without it, I never would have found a filmmaking form of my own. I definitely feel that ‘Caustic Gulp’ was the film that really cemented my visual style and themes which are commonly found in my follow up films: ‘Flamingo’ and ‘Rubber Guillotine’.
I feel ‘The Misbehaviour of Polly Paper Cut’ was a prototype. So my style has definitely evolved from my first serious short (‘Vore’) to where I am now – though there are devices and visual cues in my early work that I still use (e.g. - colour frames). 

 

What’s your relationship
with colours in your films?
 

I’ve been putting frames of colour in my work, most notably, at the beginning of each film for 10 years. I’ve always set out and made each film with a colour in mind, it sets the tone for me. But my relationship with the colours used in the actual films themselves, stems from my interest in dark subjects in brightly lit and colourful settings. I find it aesthetically pleasing but also feels the contrasts really helps impact the viewer. 


Any future projects you can tell us about? 

I have a film that premiered at the Glasgow Short Film Festival last March called FLAMINGO. It’s the film of my own that I’m most proud of. It follows a dancer who contemplates the loss of her leg while descending into the world of self-amputation. The film managed to cause members of the audience to panic and faint during the premiere. I’ve yet to release it online but plan to do so shortly after its festival run.
I also have one or two shorts I’m hoping to shoot and put out while I try and finish writing a script that I think could be my first feature length film. I don’t want to give too much away but it explore female bodybuilding and human bile. Rest assured, those who like my work can expect a lot of weird stuff to come.
Cheers creeps!

 

www.bryanmferguson.co.uk
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